takes the form of a love

takes the form of a

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Then, when election day is past and the parliamentarians have held their last mass meeting in five years, to turn from the training of the plebs to their higher and more agreeable tasks, the program commission again dissolves and the fight for the remodeling of things again takes the form of a struggle for daily bread: which in parliament is known as attendance fees.

    Mein Kampf

  • It often takes the form of a belief in the return of long-departed ancestors, and thus provides a simple explanation of the strange facts of heredity.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • When insanity takes the form of a general enfeeblement of the mental faculties as a consequence of disease, it is called dementia.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Hood's line was rushing up with cheers to occupy the crest, which here takes the form of a separate peak, and is known as “Little Round Top,” when General Warren, chief-engineer of the army, who was passing, saw the importance of the position, and determined, at all hazards, to defend it.

    A Life of Gen Robert E Lee

  • To make clear its intrinsic connection with the traditional teachings, the work takes the form of a commentary on several portions of the "Summa" of St. Thomas (I.Q. xiv, a. 13; Q. xix, a. 16; QQ. xxii-iii).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

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