Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A device for making and breaking an electric circuit by the movement of the fingers and hand.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • On the 1971 sessions reissued as part of a three-CD solo set, you can hear Corea drawing on music he'd already made, including the Latin jazz he'd played starting out, and the percussive, telegraph-key rhythms he'd rapped out on electric piano with Miles Davis.

    Chick Corea: Two Sides Of The Same Coin

  • A moment he debated, with nervously clasped hands, then, exhaustion forgotten, dashed back into the little telegraph room, found a screw-driver, and in a few minutes had loosened from the table the telegraph-key and the receiving instrument.

    The Young Railroaders Tales of Adventure and Ingenuity

  • Three years will not pass before a submarine telegraph communication will be had with Europe, and I do not despair of sitting in my office and, by a touch of the telegraph-key, asking a question simultaneously to persons in London,

    Letters and Journals 02]

  • My back ached, my finger-bones were tired, and there was a jumpy little nerve in my left temple going for all the world like a telegraph-key.

    The Prairie Mother

  • The little drama of the side-box and the telegraph-key was known to but five people -- the candidate, Harley, the two operators, and happy Mr. Moore.

    The Candidate A Political Romance

  • Morse, in inventing the telegraph-key, worked out his miracle of dot and dash in a single night.

    Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great - Volume 11 Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Businessmen

  • _Three years_ will not pass before a _submarine telegraph communication will be had with Europe_, and I do not despair of sitting in my office and, by a touch of the telegraph-key, asking a question simultaneously to persons in London, Paris, Cairo, Calcutta, and Canton, and getting the answer from all of them in _five minutes_ after the question is asked.

    Samuel F. B. Morse, His Letters and Journals In Two Volumes, Volume II

  • wireless demonstration at London's Toynbee Hall in 1896 used a fixed telegraph-key transmitter to ring a bell attached to a receiver that a colleague carried around the room.

    Wired Top Stories

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.