Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A measuring, transmitting, and receiving device used in telemetry.
  • transitive verb To measure, transmit, and receive (data) automatically from a distant source, as from a spacecraft or an electric power grid.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An instrument for determining distances in surveying, in artillery practice, etc.
  • noun An apparatus for recording electrically at a distance the indications of a physical or meteorological instrument.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun An instrument used for measuring the distance of an object from an observer.
  • noun A measuring instrument which sends the information obtained from its sensors by radio to a distant station, usually to be recorded there; also, the complete system including measuring instrument, transmitter, and receiver. Such instruments are used, for example, to measure conditions in space or in other locations difficult of access for humans observers, or merely to allow one observer to monitor conditions in many places simultaneously.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any device used in telemetry
  • noun A device used for rangefinding, especially of military targets

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any scientific instrument for observing events at a distance and transmitting the information back to the observer

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

tele- + -meter from French télémètre ("device used for measuring distance") coined by Selligue, possibly from a blend of télescope and micromètre.

Examples

  • Maven took it in his hands and felt the new leather of the strap, the fluted top telemeter ring of the oversize face, then turned it over and viewed the Swiss gears working inside the see-through crystal back.

    DEVILS IN EXILE

  • Maven took it in his hands and felt the new leather of the strap, the fluted top telemeter ring of the oversize face, then turned it over and viewed the Swiss gears working inside the see-through crystal back.

    DEVILS IN EXILE

  • Maven took it in his hands and felt the new leather of the strap, the fluted top telemeter ring of the oversize face, then turned it over and viewed the Swiss gears working inside the see-through crystal back.

    DEVILS IN EXILE

  • Maven took it in his hands and felt the new leather of the strap, the fluted top telemeter ring of the oversize face, then turned it over and viewed the Swiss gears working inside the see-through crystal back.

    DEVILS IN EXILE

  • The range to the target is apparently ascertained by those near the guns by a large telemeter, or other range finder, which is kept trained on the aeroplane, so that when the signal is made the distance to the target vertically below is at once obtained.

    The New York Times Current History of the European War, Vol 1, Issue 4, January 23, 1915

  • To assist the range-finder in his task of sighting it is necessary that he should be provided with firing tables set out in a convenient form, which, in conjunction with the telemeter, serve to facilitate training for each successive round.

    Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

  • It will be remembered that the object of a telemeter is to make known at any moment whatever the distance of a movable object, and that, too, by a direct reading and without any calculation.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 363, December 16, 1882

  • The determination of the distance from the objective and from the corresponding back-sight as well as the observation of the altitude is carried out with the aid of the telemeter.

    Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

  • This telemeter was one of the first that was tried in our military ports, and gave therein most satisfactory results.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 363, December 16, 1882

  • The accompanying cut illustrates a telemeter which was exhibited at the

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 363, December 16, 1882

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