Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete form of terror.
  • n. Common misspelling of terror.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably influenced by words like colour.

Examples

  • Thus, Justice James Wilson — a leading drafter of the U.S. Constitution, and the first prominent American legal commentator — described the prohibition as covering “a man arming himself with dangerous and unusual weapons, in such a manner, as will naturally diffuse a terrour among the people.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » “Guns as Smut: Defending the Home-Bound Second Amendment”

  • Again, however, and more distinctly, it reached her; doubt then ceased, and terrour next to horrour took its place.

    Camilla

  • Once more in the appropriate apartment of her Father, where all her earliest scenes of gayest felicity had passed, but which, of late, she had only approached with terrour, only entered to weep, she experienced a delight almost awful in the renovation of her pristine confidence, and fearless ease.

    Camilla

  • She now felt petrified; she sunk on the floor, to ejaculate a prayer for his safety, but knew not how to rise again, for terrour; nor which way next to turn, nor what even to conjecture.

    Camilla

  • There, when he rang at a bell, her terrour, lest she should suddenly encounter Mrs. Tyrold, made her bid him open the chaise door, that she might get out and walk on, before he enquired for Molly.

    Camilla

  • At Alton they stopt to sleep; and, her immediate terrour removed, she became more sensible of what she owed to Lady Isabella, to whom, in the course of the evening, she recounted frankly the whole history of her debts, except what related to Lionel.

    Camilla

  • Eugenia protested herself convinced that Bellamy had no real design against either his own life or her's, though terrour, at the moment, had conquered her: he had meant but to affright her into consent, knowing well her word once given, with whatever violence torn from her, would be held sacred.

    Camilla

  • Eugenia, then, opening the door, found her sister almost demolished with terrour and dismay.

    Camilla

  • Now then, that at length, we find you, excite not new terrour, by consigning yourself to willing despair. '

    Camilla

  • 'Ah, Sir!' she answered, recovered from her terrour, yet deep in reflection, 'this is only by bribery, and gross bribery, too!

    Camilla

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