Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of terrour.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Brought up with religious terrours, yet ill instructed in religious principles, the dread of future punishment nearly demolished her, though no regular creed of right kept her consistently or systematically in any uniform exercise of good.

    Camilla

  • He could not bear to have death presented to him in any shape; for his constitutional melancholy made the king of terrours more frightful.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • I answered, “Sir, notwithstanding all the seriousness, and all the terrours, I have no objection to your publishing your play; and as you live at a great distance, (Devonshire, I believe,) if you will send it to me, I will convey it to the press.”

    The Life of Samuel Johnson LL.D.

  • Out of this chaos of mingled purposes and casualties the ancient poets, according to the laws which custom had prescribed, selected some the crimes of men, and some their absurdities; some the momentous vicissitudes of life, and some the lighter occurrences; some the terrours of distress, and some the gayeties of prosperity.

    Preface to Shakespeare

  • Out of this chaos of mingled purposes and casualties the ancient poets, according to the laws which custom had prescribed, selected some the crimes of men, and some their absurdities; some the momentous vicissitudes of life, and some the lighter occurrences; some the terrours of distress, and some the gayeties of prosperity.

    Preface to Shakespeare

  • 'What hopes, what terrours does thy gift create, Ambiguous emblem of uncertain fate: The myrtle, ensign of supreme command, Consign'd by Venus to Melissa's hand; Not less capricious than a reigning fair, Now grants, and now rejects a lover's prayer.

    Life Of Johnson

  • Your mind is now full of the fate of Dury [1]; but his fate is past, and nothing remains but to try what reflection will suggest to mitigate the terrours of a violent death, which is more formidable at the first glance, than on a nearer and more steady view.

    Life Of Johnson

  • He could not bear to have death presented to him in any shape; for his constitutional melancholy made the king of terrours more frightful.

    Life of Johnson

  • The noble army of the martyrs, through all the smoke and fires and terrours of martyrdom, saw that bleeding form of the Captain of their salvation, and heard His inspiriting call, and passed on through all with a shout of triumph to His side.

    True eminence founded on holiness : a discourse occasioned by the death of Lieut. Gen. T.J. Jackson : preached in the First Presbyterian Church of Lynchburg, May 24th, 1863,

  • Page 28 sense of right; and it gave to the soldier the bitter reflection that his government cared but little for him in that martyrdom on the gallows or captivity in dungeons with the terrours of which the enemy assailed him.

    The Rival Administrations: Richmond and Washington in December, 1863.

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