Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A form used only in the phrases his, thy, etc., thankes, of his, thy, etc., accord; voluntarily.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Example: “Ye knowen wel that euery lusty knight, / that loueth paramours and hath his might / Were it in Engelond or elliswhere / They wold hir thankes wilnen to be there.” ‘hir’ is a ME form of ‘their’ re: pragmatics: When an antecedent is semantically male, male pronouns are used.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Spurious Grammatical “Rules” of Every Sort Are My Abhorrence

  • And having given Cistio most hearty thankes for his kindnesse, and the Wine his due commendation: many dayes afterwardes (so long as they continued there) they found the like courteous entertainment, and with the good liking of honest Cistio.

    The Decameron

  • Calandrino was highly pleased with his words, returning master Doctor infinite thankes, and referring all to his disposing.

    The Decameron

  • Madame, I must needes give thankes to heaven and you, because my desires are amply accomplished, and both time and your deserts doe justly challenge, that I should accordingly quite you before my departure.

    The Decameron

  • The Count returned his Highnesse most humble thankes, desiring to know of whence, and what she was?

    The Decameron

  • Dioneus having ended this his Tale, for which the Ladies returned him no thankes, but rather angerly frowned on him: the

    The Decameron

  • The woman gladly did as he desired, and Landolpho returning her infinite thankes, for the loving kindnesse shee had affoorded him, throwing the sacke on his necke, passed by a Barke to Brundusiam, and from thence to Tranium, where Merchants in the City bestowed good garments on him, he acquainting them with his disasterous fortunes, but not a word concerning his last good successe.

    The Decameron

  • Thus came I hither, and thus remaine here, where I am able to welcome my brother Andrea, thankes more to Fortune, then any friendlinesse in him.

    The Decameron

  • Take this Morter and Pestell, beare them home to Belcolore, and tell her: Sir Simon sends them home with thankes, they having sufficiently served his turne, and desire her likewise, to send me my Cloake, which the Boy left as a pledge for better remembrance, and because she would not lend it without a pawne.

    The Decameron

  • After that Madame Eliza had concluded her Novell, and every one of the company given thankes to Fortune, for delivering poore

    The Decameron

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