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Examples

  • Then, in the spring of 1987, the directorship of the CIA was assumed by the venerable William Webster, who had spent the previous nine years restoring the reputation of the FBI.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • This was tried through the establishment of the National Security Planning Group NSPG, a high-level body that consisted of the president, vice president, the secretaries of state and defense, the CIA director, the national security adviser, and Reagans top three White House lieutenants.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • Less than four weeks after the July 10 White House meeting, the CIA prepared a papera top-secret presidential daily briefdetailing all it knew about the possibility that Al Qaeda might attack in the United States.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • The idea for the program came, strangely enough, from Bill Casey, the CIA director.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • This country needs to go on a war footing now, Cofer Black, the CIA counterterrorism chief, told Rice.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • As early as February 1961, before the Bay of Pigs fiasco, Bundy was suggesting that with the developing pattern of responsibility in the Department of State, the president should move Richard Bissell from the CIA to a top position at Foggy Bottom, where he could play the role of senior operating executive officer and energize the department.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • As the CIA homed in on al-Kuwaiti, John's team continually updated the memo with fresh information.

    Persistent CIA hunter brought down bin Laden

  • Bill Casey and others at the CIA drafted a plan to meet the Communist threat in Central America through a covert program that, over the next few months, would provide for the support of anti-Sandinista Nicaraguans who would try to halt the flow of Soviet-made arms from Cuba to Nicaragua and El Salvador.

    An American Life

  • Then, in an effort to control policy pronouncements and curb national security leaks, Clark drafted a presidential directive requiring any person working in the White House, State and Defense Departments, or the CIA to obtain advance approval before talking to the news media.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • There were also tasks: For one recent, detailed account, see Tim Weiner, Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA New York: Doubleday, 2007, esp. chaps. 17 and 18.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

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