Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. the adherents of any system of religious belief; esp. used as an epithet of the followers of Mohammed.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • After his death, the faithful Marie Dénarnaud lived on in the Villa Bethania.

    The Templar Revelation

  • It was because this doctrine was likely to be a scandal even to the faithful that Augustine wrote his famous work, "De mendacio".

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Every year during the time the faithful can satisfy their Easter duty, the "Quam singulari" must be read to the people in the vernacular.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • German cemetery (Campo Santo), a confraternity "in honour of the bitter Passion of Christ and of the Sorrowful Mother, to comfort and assist all the faithful souls", was erected (1448) by the penitentiary, Johannes Goldener of Nüremberg, later titular Bishop of

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Hence arose in the schools that immense mass of inferential teaching deduced from the written word according to the rules of a special process of reasoning, handed down for generations in the esoteric teaching of the faithful scribes as the official interpretation of the Law, and finally committed to writing, particularly in the Mishnas and Talmuds.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Carpentras in 527 (Mansi, VIII, 707), make it quite clear that while the bishop's right was maintained in theory, the practice prevailed of leaving the offerings of the faithful to the church in which they were made so long as they were there needed.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • After the convention, I arranged a Pennsylvania fly-around for Haley that included a press event in Lancaster County, a very Republican-friendly area in a state where Dole needed an extremely high turnout among the faithful if he was to have a chance of winning its electoral votes.

    How to Rig an Election

  • The Council of Orléans in 511 enacted in its fifteenth decree that every kind of contribution or rent offered by the faithful was in accordance with the ancient canons to remain entirely at the disposition of the bishop, though of the gifts actually presented at the altar he was to receive only a third part.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • He was not a pre-millenarian, one of those who believe that chaos on earth is an indication of the imminence of the Second Coming and that the faithful should therefore do nothing to stand in its way.

    The Killing Kind

  • So again money given at the Offertory in any quasi-parochial church, or collected by the faithful from house to house is not to be considered as a personal gift to the priest in charge but as intended for the support of the mission.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

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