Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. specifically, in the United States, the fourth day of July, the anniversary of the declaration of American independence.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Probst (op.cit. infra) thinks that it was at Rome, in the fourth century under Pope Damasus, that this liturgical "reform" took place, especially in arranging the liturgical prayers to suit the season and the feasts of the saints.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Still less can we be certain that there was continuity between the usage referred to in the Eastern Church of the fourth century and the institution which, as already mentioned above, we find described by the Council of M√Ęcon in 585.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • But to really pin the murders on the guys who ran the marijuana operation, we have to track down the fourth man, the kid who escaped the murder plot, Craig Wilson.

    The Huckleberry Murders

  • In North Africa the first metropolitan appears during the fourth century, the Bishop of Carthage being recognized as primate of the dioceses of Northern Africa; metropolitans of the separate provinces gradually appear, although the boundaries of these provinces did not coincide with the divisions of the empire.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Hebrew Text, with Origen's Hexapla and the other ancient versions in view, was completed by St. Jerome about the end of the fourth century at Bethlehem.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • In Eastern canon law since the fourth century (cf. also the Synod of Antioch of 341, can. ix), it was a principle that every civil province was likewise a church province under the supreme direction of the metropolitan, i.e. of the bishop of the provincial capital.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Lady Lucy Sherard, daughter of the fourth Earl of Harborough.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • This heresy originated in Spain in the fourth century and was derived from the Gnostic-Manichaean doctrines taught by Marcus, an Egyptian from Memphis.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • In the fourth room Tyler entered, a wooden fence stretched the width of the room, with a six-foot-wide gate in the center.

    The Ark

  • His name undoubtedly appeared in the catalogue of Roman martyrs of the fourth century under date of 30 April, which is the day that the Martyrology of Jerome assigns him.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

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