Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An antioxidant polyphenol found in tea; any derivative of this compound

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Modern scientific research has shown the health benefits of tea can be attributed to catechins, other polyphenols and flavonoids, like theaflavin, which have all been shown to possess highly anti-oxidative properties.

    Miriam Novalle: The Power of Tea

  • Brief enzyme action produces a yellowish compound theaflavin, center that is both very bitter and astringent.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The addition of ice to normally brewed tea tends to make the tea cloudy, due to the formation of particles of a complex between caffeine and theaflavin.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • More extensive enzyme action produces a compound theaflavin digallate, right that is moderately bitter and astringent.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • * In addition to its theaflavin content, Thea-Stat also contains other compounds typically found in green tea including epigallocatechin gallate, a powerful antioxidant.

    Wil's Ebay E-Store

  • These include ensuring the identity of the raw tea product; testing for adulterants such as pesticides and heavy metals; and confirming the amount of antioxidants, including catechin, theaflavin and xanthine alkaloids and polyphenols, so manufacturers can be certain that the product they offer is exactly what they say it is.

    NutraIngredients-USA RSS

  • That's because black tea leaves undergo extensive fermentation, during which the majority of the catechins are enzymatically oxidized to the major pigments of black tea leaves, theaflavin and thearubigen.

    Wil's Ebay E-Store

  • A combination of two phenolics gives a kind of molecule theaflavin that’s yellow to light copper in color, less bitter but still astringent.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • This technique extracts less caffeine and theaflavin than brewing in hot water, so the caffeine-theaflavin complexes don’t form in sufficient quantities to become visible in the chilled tea.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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