Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the divine, especially a divine fire
  • n. sulfur, especially in the context of fire and brimstone

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek θεῖον.

Examples

  • Secondly, Terata, "prodigies" or "wonders," works beyond the power of nature or energy of natural causes, wrought to fill men with wonder and admiration, manifesting to theion, and surprising men with a sense of the presence of God.

    Pneumatologia

  • Ek ton theion graphan theologoumen, kai thelosin hoi echthroi, kai me.

    Pneumatologia

  • "He is convinced of all, judged of all;" he cannot but grant that there is theion ti, "a divine efficacy" in it or accompanying of it.

    Pneumatologia

  • * Ek ton theion graphan theologoumen, kai thelosin hoi echthroi, kai me.

    Pneumatologia

  • * He ton theion logion didaskalia, to piston aph 'heautes echousa dia to theopneuston einai;: [4859] 1

    Pneumatologia

  • : He ton theion logion didaskalia, to piston aph 'heautes echousa dia to theopneuston einai; -- "The doctrine of the divine oracles hath its credibility from itself, because of its divine inspiration."

    Pneumatologia

  • Methionine (because the side-chain contains an atom grouping called the "methyl group," which is in turn attached to a sulfur atom, called theion in Greek),

    The Human Brain

  • He is not the _ens entium_, or _to theion_, or any other of the thousand titles with which ancient and modern speculation has invested him, but simply the Architect, -- as the Greeks have it, the ἀρχὸς, the chief workman, -- under whom we are all workmen also; [201] and hence our labor is his worship.

    The Symbolism of Freemasonry

  • A trace of this old feeling lingers in the Greek word θειον (theion), divine, which was used to denote both lightning and sulphur.

    Man or Matter

  • [Greek: To theion ergon enthade phtharen chronô kainei manouêl eusebês autokratôr.]

    Journal of a Visit to Constantinople and Some of the Greek Islands in the Spring and Summer of 1833

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