Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A student of theology
  • n. A theologian

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See theologue.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek θεός (theos, "god") + -λόγος (-logos, "one who speaks (in a certain manner)"), equivalent to theo +‎ -log

Examples

  • The two clergymen met once or twice in their calls upon the new-comer, and each acquired an opinion of the other: John Fenn said to himself that the old minister was a good man, if he was an Episcopalian; and Dr. Lavendar said to William King that he hoped there would be a match between the "theolog" and Philippa.

    The Voice

  • Episcopalian; and Dr. Lavendar said to William King that he hoped there would be a match between the "theolog" and Philippa.

    The Voice

  • Mr. Sampson desire to know what theolog. books he reads with H.

    The Virginians

  • This was true of the most serious theolog - ical difference, the famous filoque clause, the Western view that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Son as well as from the Father.

    CHRISTIANITY IN HISTORY

  • A parallel criticism had been urged by Epicurus who saw no sign of justice or moral - ity in the universe, and therefore rejected any theolog - ical basis for conduct; he regarded perception and feeling as sole criteria for ethics.

    JUSTICE

  • Hegel's left-wing successors, with Marx the most influential of them, seek to reject whatever is theolog - ical in Hegel's thinking.

    PERFECTIBILITY OF MAN

  • This is linked with the concept of immaculate perfection, for which to be perfect is to be “free from flaw” — a flaw often defined, in theolog - ical terms, as “sin.”

    PERFECTIBILITY OF MAN

  • This applies to the association or correlation he sought to establish between the theolog - ical stage and militarism, between metaphysical modes of thought and “defensive” warfare and between the growth of positive science and the phase of industrial - ism and the cessation of war.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Page 29, Volume 2 general decline in the acceptance of Christian theolog - ical doctrines that imply determinism.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • In such talk in such contexts, there is linguistic legerdemain: we call our doubts mysteries and what is now being ap - pealed to as “the mystery of faith” is but the theolog - ical phrase for agnosticism (p. 22).

    AGNOSTICISM

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