Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Hot springs or hot baths; particularly, one of the public bathing-establishments of the ancient Greeks and Romans, which were universally patronized, and of which abundant remains survive, the chief of them in Rome.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun plural Springs or baths of warm or hot water.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun springs or baths of warm or hot water

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin. See thermal.

Examples

  • These baths, known as thermae usually provided separate rooms for cold

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • These baths, known as thermae usually provided separate rooms for cold

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • When the thermae complex was destroyed by development in 1964, parts of the walls were still standing in situ to a height of up to 13 feet (4 m), hypocausts and mosaic floors were still intact, and large sections of collapsed roofing vaults (barrel-vaulted concrete, estimated to have stood 53 feet above floor level) lay on the floors.

    Chester in the seventh century: surviving infrastructure

  • Part or all of the main baths complex thermae, still standing and still roofed;

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The thermae courtyard was repaired and resurfaced throughout the fourth century.

    Chester in the seventh century: surviving infrastructure

  • Part or all of the main baths complex thermae, still standing and still roofed;

    Chester in the seventh century: surviving infrastructure

  • Chester also had the usual components of a legionary fortress, including a headquarters building (principia), smart houses for the commander (praetorium) and senior officers, amphitheatre, stone defensive walls and a main baths building (thermae), not to mention a large harbour and a bridge crossing the River Dee.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • When the thermae complex was destroyed by development in 1964, parts of the walls were still standing in situ to a height of up to 13 feet (4 m), hypocausts and mosaic floors were still intact, and large sections of collapsed roofing vaults (barrel-vaulted concrete, estimated to have stood 53 feet above floor level) lay on the floors.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The thermae courtyard was repaired and resurfaced throughout the fourth century.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • Chester also had the usual components of a legionary fortress, including a headquarters building (principia), smart houses for the commander (praetorium) and senior officers, amphitheatre, stone defensive walls and a main baths building (thermae), not to mention a large harbour and a bridge crossing the River Dee.

    Chester in the seventh century: surviving infrastructure

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