Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Physiology Dissipation of heat from the body, as by evaporation.
  • noun Chemistry Dissociation of chemical bonds or decomposition of compounds by heat.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as dissociation, 2.
  • noun The dispersion of heat from the body, by radiation, conduction, evaporation, and the warming of excreta and dejecta.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Chem.) The resolution of a compound into parts by heat; dissociation by heat.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun chemistry The dissociation or decomposition of a material as a result of being heated
  • noun physiology The dissipation of heat from the body, especially by evaporation or radiation

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • With the Smart Xide DOT™ (dermal optimal thermolysis) laser, there is a degree of versatility previously unseen in laser surgery.

    WN.com - Business News

  • With the Smart Xide DOT™ (dermal optimal thermolysis) laser, there is a degree of versatility previously unseen in laser surgery.

    WN.com - Business News

  • Bordier created the first literature that focuses on the features and background information on the thermolysis of dermatological field of medicine.

    ReadABlog.com New Blogs and RSS Feeds

  • With the Smart Xide DOT™ (dermal optimal thermolysis) laser, there is a degree of versatility previously unseen in laser surgery.

    WN.com - Business News

  • U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2005/0173237 A1 to Bridgwater et al. teaches an ablative thermolysis reactor, shown in

    FreshPatents.com: Notable Patent Applications - 05/06/2010

  • As the name implies, make use of thermolysis enough heat to make hair grow down under the skin.

    ReadABlog.com New Blogs and RSS Feeds

  • In hydrolysis, water is combined with ammonia borane and the process requires a catalyst to generate hydrogen while, in thermolysis, the material must be heated to more than 170°C, or more than 330°F, to release sufficient quantities of hydrogen.

    The Engineer - News

  • Using water containing deuterium instead of hydrogen enabled the researchers to trace how much hydrogen is generated from the hydrolysis reaction and how much from the thermolysis reaction − details critical to understanding the process.

    The Engineer - News

  • The process combines hydrolysis and thermolysis, two hydrogen-generating processes that are not practical by themselves for vehicle applications.

    The Engineer - News

  • The process combines hydrolysis and thermolysis, two hydrogen generating processes that aren't practical themselves for vehicle applications.

    Ecofriend

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