Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. (Scots) The right of the owner of a mill to compel tenants to bring all their grain to that mill for milling.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The right which the owner of a mill possesses, by contract or law, to compel the tenants of a certain district, or of his sucken, to bring all their grain to his mill for grinding.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Scots law, a species of servitude, formerly very common in Scotland, and also prevalent in England, by which the proprietors or other possessors of lands were bound to carry the grain produced on the lands to a particular mill to be ground, to which mill the lands were said to be thirled or astricted, and also to pay a certain proportion of the grain, varying in different cases, as a remuneration for the grinding, and for the expense of the erection and maintenance of the mill. Also called sequel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I could speak to the thirlage of invecta et illata too, but let that pass.

    The Monastery

  • Those of the Sucken, or enthralled ground, were liable in penalties, if, deviating from this thirlage, (or thraldom,) they carried their grain to another mill.

    The Monastery

  • First, the council are of opinion that you should now begin to stir in the thirlage cause; and they think they will be able, from evidence NOVITER REPERTUM, to enable you to amend your condescendence upon the use and wont of the burgh, touching the GRANA

    Redgauntlet

  • We have no turbary, or any other easement; but, to compensate us, we have thirlage, outsucken multures, insucken multures, and dry multures; as also we have a soumin and roumin, as any one who has been so fortunate as to hear Mr Outram's pathetic lyric on that interesting right of pasturage will remember, in conjunction with pleasing associations.

    The Book-Hunter A New Edition, with a Memoir of the Author

  • First, the council are of opinion that you should now begin to stir in the thirlage cause; and they think they will be able, from evidence NOVITER REPERTUM, to enable you to amend your condescendence upon the use and wont of the burgh, touching the GRANA INVECTA ET ILLATA.

    Redgauntlet

  • _Sucken_, or enthralled ground, were liable in penalties, if, deviating from this thirlage, (or thraldom,) they carried their grain to another mill.

    The Monastery

  • I could speak to the thirlage of _invecta et illata_ too, but let that pass.

    The Monastery

  • 36 The under miller is, in the language of thirlage, called the knave, which, indeed, signified originally his lad.

    The Monastery

  • I have been just reflecting that the theme is becoming a little exhausted, and your experience may perhaps supply” — — “Ha, ha, ha! — my experience supply!” interrupted Mr. Fairscribe, with a laugh of derision; — “why, you might as well ask my son James’s experience to supply a case” about thirlage.

    The Surgeon's Daughter

  • a laugh of derision; -- "why, you might as well ask my son James's experience to supply a case" about thirlage.

    The Surgeon's Daughter

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