Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The cardinal number immediately following thirty-three and preceding thirty-five.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective being four more than thirty

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It meant that when a minority wanted to sustain a filibuster, they would have to muster forty-one votes instead of just thirty-four.

    The Good Fight

  • If they could muster thirty-four votes to block a consumer bill or Legal Services, and they always did, they would certainly round up enough votes to block filibuster reform and retain their power.

    The Good Fight

  • If they could muster thirty-four votes to block a consumer bill or Legal Services, and they always did, they would certainly round up enough votes to block filibuster reform and retain their power.

    The Good Fight

  • This meant that a disciplined minority of senators—thirty-four or fewer—could keep debate going indefinitely and control the Senate in defiance of the majority.

    The Good Fight

  • This meant that a disciplined minority of senators—thirty-four or fewer—could keep debate going indefinitely and control the Senate in defiance of the majority.

    The Good Fight

  • It meant that when a minority wanted to sustain a filibuster, they would have to muster forty-one votes instead of just thirty-four.

    The Good Fight

  • Figure 3.6 is based on Gallup Poll archives, but the same pattern appears in the National Election Studies data, which show a drop in weekly or near-weekly church attendance from 47 percent in 1956 to 34 percent in 1966 among Americans aged twenty-five to thirty-four.

    American Grace

  • An estimated 12 percent of African-American men ages twenty to thirty-four are in jail or prison.

    The Conservative Assault on the Constitution

  • Of white men aged twenty-one to thirty-four, weekly churchgoing rose from 28 percent in 1952 to 44 percent in 1964.

    American Grace

  • If they could muster thirty-four votes to block a consumer bill or Legal Services, and they always did, they would certainly round up enough votes to block filibuster reform and retain their power.

    The Good Fight

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