Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of thistledown.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • By September the purple fireweed that springs up beside old camps, and in the bois brute, had bloomed and scattered its myriad, impalpable thistledowns over crystal floors.

    The Dwelling Place of Light — Complete

  • French port dancing across the veil of rain, like thistledowns of fire, and presently we were at rest at a stone quay.

    A Traveller in War-Time

  • Seaweed of strange varieties, and of every fantastic shape and texture, the round balls of fibrous grass, like gigantic thistledowns, which scurry before the light breeze, as though endued with life, the white oval shells of the cuttle-fish, and the shapeless hideous masses of dead _medusæ_, all lie about in extricable confusion on the sandy shores of the East Coast.

    In Court and Kampong Being Tales and Sketches of Native Life in the Malay Peninsula

  • Page delicately, with her gloved hands, she picked off the coarse grass and the thistledowns, while Charles, empty handed, waited till she had finished.

    Madame Bovary

  • They drift downward, at first, as noiselessly as thistledowns; then they strike the rocks and come crashing towards the lake with the hollow roar of an avalanche.

    Fisherman's Luck and Some Other Uncertain Things

  • The strange little dancers floated hither and thither over my master's baby face, as light as thistledowns, and as graceful as the slender plumes they wore in their hats and bonnets.

    The Holy Cross and Other Tales

  • Emma's skirt, too long, trailed a little on the ground; from time to time she stopped to pull it up, and then delicately, with her gloved hands, she picked off the coarse grass and the thistledowns, while Charles, empty handed, waited till she had finished.

    Madame Bovary A Tale of Provincial Life

  • Emma's dress, too long, trailed a little on the ground; from time to time she stopped to pull it up, and then delicately, with her gloved hands, she picked off the coarse grass and the thistledowns, while Charles, empty handed, waited till she had finished.

    Madame Bovary

  • Emma’s dress, too long, trailed a little on the ground; from time to time she stopped to pull it up, and then delicately, with her gloved hands, she picked off the coarse grass and the thistledowns, while Charles, empty handed, waited till she had finished.

    Madame Bovary

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