Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of thunderbolt.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And again, desiring that the divine Majesty should make his enemies tremble, he says: Send forth lightning and thou shalt scatter them: shoot out thy arrows, and thou shalt trouble them: [560] where he terms thunderbolts the arrows and darts of God.

    Treatise on the Love of God

  • The thunderbolts are his winged arrows from his bow of fire, and his grape and canister from the pent-up magazines of the skies.

    Autobiography, sermons, addresses, and essays of Bishop L. H. Holsey, D. D.,

  • I have never heard the very rude chipped and unpolished axes of the older drift men or cave men described as thunderbolts: they are too rough and shapeless ever to attract attention from any except professed archæologists.

    Falling in Love With Other Essays on More Exact Branches of Science

  • The Times article reveals that Republicans claim that the conservative movement's "thunderbolts" are emerging from Gingrich's office, not the oldline Heritage Foundation or Cato Institute: He is "at the zenith of influence in conservative Washington."

    Greg Mitchell: Exclusive: Excerpts from Wild 'NYT Magazine' Piece on Newt Gingrich Coming On Sunday!

  • "Names such as thunderbolts, tonguestones, toadstones, snakestones and devil's toenails became widely used for different types of fossils in Britain," says Paul Taylor, a fossils expert at the Natural History Museum in London.

    Archive 2007-02-01

  • With his bones, meanwhile, Shakra joyfully caused to be made many kinds of weapons, such as thunderbolts, discs, heavy maces, and many kinds of clubs and bludgeons.

    The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12

  • Its supposed medicinal virtues, like those of the fossil teeth of China and the belemnites ( "thunderbolts") of this country, seem to have been suggested by the peculiarity of its mode of occurrence.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 595, May 28, 1887

  • In opening his paper, Mr. Symons says that he undertook his investigation as to the existence of "thunderstones," or "thunderbolts" as he calls them -- "feeling certain that there was a weak point somewhere, inasmuch as 'thunderbolts' have no existence."

    The Book of the Damned

  • Such objects are called "thunderbolts" in these countries.

    The Book of the Damned

  • While we were speeding toward Delhi in a 'plane provided for us by the Royal Air Force, McGowan and his staff were sending cablegrams in code to London giving a detailed explanation of Dorje's cypher, and London was distributing the information to all the governments of the civilized world through the embassies and legations, along with a careful description of Dorje's "thunderbolts" and the glass flasks containing his "death's breath."

    Jimgrim

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