Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of thunderstone.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Right up into the "Age of Enlightenment" which produced our Constitution and the French Revolution -- and was so much more intellectually advanced than the Church condemning Galileo for his heliocentric blasphemy -- the leading scientists of the day were unified in discounting stories of "thunderstones" that fell from the sky.

    Chris Weigant: Friday Talking Points [150] -- A Fortean Week

  • As to the "thunderstones," I think that he investigated them mostly "for the credit of Englishmen," or in the spirit of the Royal Krakatoa Committee, or about as the commission from the French Academy investigated meteorites.

    The Book of the Damned

  • In opening his paper, Mr. Symons says that he undertook his investigation as to the existence of "thunderstones," or "thunderbolts" as he calls them -- "feeling certain that there was a weak point somewhere, inasmuch as 'thunderbolts' have no existence."

    The Book of the Damned

  • Blinkenberg gives many instances of the superstition of "thunderstones" which flourishes only where mentality is in a lamentable state -- or universally.

    The Book of the Damned

  • Nevertheless this is the psycho-tropism of science to all "thunderstones" said to have fallen luminously.

    The Book of the Damned

  • Of ten "thunderstones," figured upon different pages in Blinkenberg's book, nine show no sign of ever having been attached to a handle: one is perforated.

    The Book of the Damned

  • And the notion of "thunderstones" is as wide as geography itself.

    The Book of the Damned

  • More about the "thunderstones" of Burma, in the _Proc.

    The Book of the Damned

  • If you, too, revolt against coincidence after coincidence after coincidence, but find our interpretation of "thunderstones" just a little too strong or rich for digestion, we recommend the explanation of one, Tallius, written in 1649:

    The Book of the Damned

  • As to "thunderstones" not said to have fallen luminously, and not said to have been found sticking in trees, we are told by faithful hypnotics that astonished rustics come upon prehistoric axes that have been washed into sight by rains, and jump to the conclusion that the things have fallen from the sky.

    The Book of the Damned

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