Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Greek antiquity, an altar; particularly, the small altar of Dionysus which occupied the central point of the orchestra of the Greek theater, and was a visible token of the religious character of the dramatic representations.
  • n. [capitalized] [NL. (Fabricius, 1808).] In entomology, a genus of hesperian butterflies, or skippers. T. alveolus is the grizzled skipper, a British species.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This 'thymele' was in the centre of the whole edifice, all the measurements were calculated, and the semi-circle of the amphitheatre was drawn, from this point.

    Literary Remains, Volume 2

  • This elevation was named the 'thymele', ([Greek (transliterated): thumelae]) and served to recall the origin and original purpose of the chorus, as an altar-song in honour of the presiding deity.

    Literary Remains, Volume 2

  • It is the theatre which vulgarises these things; the modern theatre in which we see no altar! where the thymele is replaced by the caprice of a popular actor.

    The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett

  • At such times the choragus, or leader of the chorus, took his station on the top of the thymele, to see what was passing on the stage, and to converse with the characters there present.

    Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature

  • The thymele was situated in the very centre of the building; all the measurements were made from it, and the semicircle of the amphitheatre was described round it as the centre.

    Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature

  • This _thymele_ was in the centre of the whole edifice, all the measurements were calculated, and the semi-circle of the amphitheatre was drawn from this point.

    Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher

  • This elevation was named the _thymele_ (θυμέλη), and served to recall the origin and original purpose of the chorus, as an altar-song in honour of the presiding deity.

    Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher

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