Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of tilbury.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Plenty of hackney cabs and coaches too; gigs, phaetons, large-wheeled tilburies, and private carriages — rather of a clumsy make, and not very different from the public vehicles, but built for the heavy roads beyond the city pavement.

    American Notes for General Circulation

  • Not knowing whether Roger would arrive in a carriage or on foot, the needlewoman from the Rue du Tourniquet looked by turns at the foot-passengers, and at the tilburies — light cabs introduced into Paris by the

    A Second Home

  • Landaus, barouches, or tilburies, there were none in those simple days.

    Old Mortality

  • Behind the carriage there rode a hundred or more noblemen and gentlemen of the west country, and then a line of gigs, tilburies, and carriages wound away down the Grinstead road as far as our eyes could follow it.

    Rodney stone

  • When the horses were in the stable there was a double line of rustic conveyances along the road: carts, cabriolets, tilburies, wagonettes, traps of every shape and age, tipping forward on their shafts or else tipping backward with the shafts up in the air.

    Complete Original Short Stories of Guy De Maupassant

  • Plenty of hackney cabs and coaches, too; gigs, phaetons, large-wheeled tilburies, and private carriages -- rather of a clumsy make, and not very different from the public vehicles, but built for the heavy roads beyond the city pavement.

    American Notes

  • Plenty of hackney cabs and coaches too; gigs, phaetons, large-wheeled tilburies, and private carriages - rather of a clumsy make, and not very different from the public vehicles, but built for the heavy roads beyond the city pavement.

    American Notes

  • There were all the Dublin notorieties, swarming in barouches, and tilburies, and outside jaunting-cars -- smart clerks in the post-office, mounted upon kicking devils from Dycer's and Lalouette's stables -- attorney's wives and daughters from York-street, and a stray doctor or so on a hack that looked as if it had been lectured on for the six winter months at the

    The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer — Complete

  • The rage for married women, is over; but they are not out, merely negatives, like the Tilburies, or the three Mr. Clock-cases, who, by the bye, still drive tilburies, as do the Piccadilly butchers.

    Paris Lions and London Tigers

  • Alencon, which up to 1816 could boast of only two private carriages, saw, without amazement, in the course of ten years, coupes, landaus, tilburies, and cabriolets rolling through her streets.

    The Jealousies of a Country Town

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