Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See ferrotype.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An early, remarkably durable form of photograph (technically a photographic negative), printed on a tin plate, then varnished.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Same as ferrotype.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A photographic positive taken on a thin plate of japanned iron; a ferrotype.

Etymologies

From tin + type. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The tintype format was an early type of photography which used metal plates to create reverse images, and the photograph led to the mistaken belief that the outlaw was left handed.

    Billy the Kid photograph sold at auction in Colorado for $2.3m

  • The black and white tintype of the 19th-century wild west outlaw was sold at auction in Denver, Colorado, and is believed to have been taken in 1879 or 1880 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico.

    Billy the Kid photograph sold at auction in Colorado for $2.3m

  • The tintype was auctioned off along with more than 400 other Western-themed items, including documents from Buffalo Bill's aborted divorce, Native American antiquities, and a painting from Andy Warhol's "Cowboys and Indians" series depicting a Navajo woman with a baby on her back.

    Billy the Kid image sells for more than $2M

  • They are reverse images, and the Billy the Kid tintype led to the mistaken belief that Billy the Kid was a lefty.

    Billy the Kid image sells for more than $2M

  • The tintype is believed to have been taken in 1879 or 1880 in Fort Sumner, N.M. It shows the outlaw dressed in a rumpled hat and layers of clothes, including a bulky sweater.

    Billy the Kid image sells for more than $2M

  • Billy the Kid gave the image to a friend, Dan Dedrick, and the tintype has been owned by his descendants, the Upham family, ever since.

    Billy the Kid image sells for more than $2M

  • Strothers, an 'tell' m not on the Boss's ugly tintype.

    CHAPTER XII

  • "Maybe I don't know what God looks like, but take it from me I've seen a tintype of the devil," Mary gurgled, emotionally fluttering back and forth between laughter and tears.

    CHAPTER XIV

  • In Lisa Wood's "Swallowing Plates," she situates tintype-era photos alongside foreign bodies she imagines people to have swallowed, and creates beautiful assemblages as unexpected memorials in each case.

    Mary Cappello: Swallow This!

  • I'm sure there's experience that can only be gained with film and a darkroom, but there's also experience that can only be gained with, say, tintype work.

    Making Light: Open thread 135

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