Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A head-dress for women.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I see how thine eye would emulate the diamond: thou hast the right arched beauty of the brow that becomes the ship-tire, the tire-valiant, or any tire of Venetian admittance.

    Act III. Scene III. The Merry Wives of Windsor

  • The national "tire-valiant" is a galeated crest not unlike the cuirassier's helmet, and the hair, trained from the sides into a high ridge running along the cranium, not unfrequently projects far beyond the forehead.

    Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo Volume 1

  • III. iii.60 (260,4) [that becomes the ship-tire, the tire-valiant, or any tire of Venetian admittance] [Warburton had explained the two tents as head-dresses, and "of Venetian admittance" as "which will admit to be adorned."]

    Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

  • I see how thine eye would emulate the diamond: thou hast the right arched beauty of the brow that becomes the ship-tire, the tire-valiant, or any tire of

    The Merry Wives of Windsor

  • I see how thine eye would emulate the diamond; thou hast the right arched beauty of the brow that becomes the ship-tire, the tire-valiant, or any tire of Venetian admittance.

    The Merry Wives of Windsor

  • The national “tire-valiant” is a galeated crest not unlike the cuirassier’s helmet, and the hair, trained from the sides into a high ridge running along the cranium, not unfrequently projects far beyond the forehead.

    Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo

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