Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Without a tocher, or marriage portion.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • 'Lealty is a rare plant ony gate,' sighed Margaret, 'and where sae little is recked of our Scots royalty, mayhap ye'll find that tocherless lasses be less sought for than at hame.

    Two Penniless Princesses

  • A fair maid tocherless will get mair wooers than husbands.

    The Proverbs of Scotland

  • -- And yet, 'said he, resuming more cheerfully,' it's maybe as weel as it is; for, as Baron of Bradwardine, I might have thought it my duty to insist upon certain compliances respecting name and bearings, whilk now, as a landless laird wi 'a tocherless daughter, no one can blame me for departing from.'

    Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since

  • Bradwardine, I might have thought it my duty to insist upon certain compliances respecting name and bearings, whilk now, as a landless laird wi 'a tocherless daughter, no one can blame me for departing from.'

    Waverley

  • “Fie, fie, cummer,” said the matron of Glendearg, hitching her seat of honour, in her turn, a little nearer to the cuttle-stool on which Tibb was seated; “weel-favoured is past my time of day; but I might pass then, for I wasna sae tocherless but what I had a bit land at my breast-lace.

    The Monastery

  • ` ` it's maybe as weel as it is; for, as Baron of Bradwardine, I might have thought it my duty to insist upon certain compliances respecting name and bearings, whilk now, as a landless laird wi 'a tocherless daughter, no one can blame me for departing from.' '

    The Waverley

  • 'it's maybe as weel as it is; for, as Baron of Bradwardine, I might have thought it my duty to insist upon certain compliances respecting name and bearings, whilk now, as a landless laird wi' a tocherless daughter, no one can blame me for departing from. '

    Waverley — Volume 2

  • I'm of a good family, and had plenty, and the ones with the tocher won't have me, and the tocherless girls I dare not betray. "

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • "Fie, fie, cummer," said the matron of Glendearg, hitching her seat of honour, in her turn, a little nearer to the cuttle-stool on which Tibb was seated; "weel-favoured is past my time of day; but I might pass then, for I wasna sae tocherless but what I had a bit land at my breast-lace.

    The Monastery

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