Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dish or bowl for measuring the toll in mills. See toll . Also formerly called toll-hop.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Miller held his peace; for, as his usual conversation turned chiefly on his clapper and toll-dish, he had no mind to brag of his wealth in presence of Christie of the Clinthill, or to intrude his discourse on the English cavalier.

    The Monastery

  • The two champions being alike armed with quarter-staves, stepped forward into the centre of the open space, in order to have the full benefit of the moonlight; the thieves in the meantime laughing, and crying to their comrade, “Miller! beware thy toll-dish.”

    Ivanhoe

  • The two champions being alike armed with quarter-staves, stepped forward into the centre of the open space, in order to have the full benefit of the moonlight; the thieves in the meantime laughing, and crying to their comrade, ` ` Miller! beware thy toll-dish. ''

    Ivanhoe

  • Just then the miller went down stairs to the meal-trough; I heard his feet on the steps, and not thinking much what I was doing, ran into the mill, and taking the four-quart toll-dish nearly full of corn out of the hopper, carried it out and poured it into the trough before the horse, and placed the dish back before the miller came up from below.

    A Study Of Hawthorne

  • Jan, toll-dish in hand, with a quaint business gravity, was met by a dame who was just raising her old back after letting down her sack of gleanings, with garrulous good-humor in her blinking eyes and withered face.

    Jan of the Windmill

  • George stayed on, and though the very next time the windmiller was absent his "voolish" assistant did not get so much as a toll-dish of corn ground to flour, he was so full of penitence and promises that he weathered that tempest and many a succeeding one.

    Jan of the Windmill

  • I swear by my toll-dish, I'll lodge thee all night.

    The Book of Brave Old Ballads

  • The two champions being alike armed with quarter-staves, stepped forward into the centre of the open space, in order to have the full benefit of the moonlight; the thieves in the meantime laughing, and crying to their comrade, "Miller! beware thy toll-dish."

    Ivanhoe. A Romance

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