Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A house adjoining a tollgate and occupied by a toll collector.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as tollbooth.
  • noun A house placed on or beside a road near a toll-gate, or at the end of a toll-bridge, where the toll-taker is stationed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A house occupied by a receiver of tolls.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A building where a toll is collected on a toll road.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a booth at a tollgate where the toll collector collects tolls

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

toll +‎ house

Examples

  • Beyond the tollhouse was a long, narrow road winding north and west through the forest and out to the main north–south trade route.

    Burning Tower

  • Beyond the tollhouse was a long, narrow road winding north and west through the forest and out to the main north–south trade route.

    Burning Tower

  • Back of the tollhouse was a neatly fenced garden, well filled with old-fashioned flowers; and, still farther on, a good-sized house, from which a box-bordered path led through the garden to the tollhouse.

    The Captain's Toll-Gate

  • Some bites taste like a tollhouse chocolate chip cookie.

    Kitchen Sink Cookies

  • Some bites taste like a tollhouse chocolate chip cookie.

    Archive 2008-05-01

  •  At lunch, they ate peanut butter sandwiches and tollhouse cookies at the outdoor tables with the pigeons and the gulls and the big kids.

    Trust Walk

  • Clemens spent most of his time at the opening session observing a particularly ill-bred Washoe delegate, “Colonel” Jonathan Williams, eating an eighteen-pound raw turnip at his desk while simultaneously ushering through committee a sinuous new bill for a toll road that stretched conveniently from one tollhouse to another.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

  • Private investors stepped in to fill the gap, building railroads and turnpikes—so called because travelers had to pay tollhouse attendants to turn pikes that blocked free passage.

    Interstate 69

  • She'd sent him a shoebox of tollhouse cookies and he'd never said thanks.

    Have You Seen Me?

  • Clemens spent most of his time at the opening session observing a particularly ill-bred Washoe delegate, “Colonel” Jonathan Williams, eating an eighteen-pound raw turnip at his desk while simultaneously ushering through committee a sinuous new bill for a toll road that stretched conveniently from one tollhouse to another.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

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