Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dance performed by a number of persons some of whom carry lighted torches.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The torches were fixed on poles around the floor, for the torch-dance was over.

    The King Must Die

  • The royal party mount the platform, and in honor of the event the torch-dance begins.

    The Log School-House on the Columbia

  • One band relieved another at banquet and dance; meantime the young people who became weary of the pleasures of the table first, withdrew to one end of the long hall for the "torch-dance," or the "cushion-dance," while still the servants at the other end continued to carry in the succession of dishes to the feast; if you wish to count the courses there is still the portly kitchen record.

    Pater Peter. English.

  • The old Berezowski as usual was on the outer edge of the circle of dancers; in the mazurka and the torch-dance, where it was only necessary to stamp and shout, he had his part; but in the cushion dance, where the kisses came, he failed as usual.

    Pater Peter. English.

  • We also have eyes, or ought to have; we have hustings, telescopes; we have lights, link-lights and rushlights of an enlightened free Press, burning and dancing everywhere, as in a universal torch-dance; singeing your whiskers as you traverse the public thoroughfares in town and country.

    Past and Present

  • We also have eyes, or ought to have; we have hustings, telescopes; we have lights, link-lights and rush-lights of an enlightened free Press, burning and dancing everywhere, as in a universal torch-dance; singeing your whiskers as you traverse the public thoroughfares in town and country.

    Past and Present Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII.

  • His speech is wild and wondrous: unearthly Phantasms dancing now their torch-dance round his soul; the soul itself looking out, fire-radiant, motionless, girt together for that great hour!

    The French Revolution

  • Edwald hastened to give his hand to his fair bride; and while he advanced with her to the midst of the stately hall, Froda offered his hand for the torch-dance to a noble lady who stood the nearest to him, without farther observing her, and took with her the next place to the wedded pair.

    Aslauga's Knight

  • A squire, who had hastened after them, announced that the knightly bridegroom was expected for the torch-dance, and as they returned,

    Aslauga's Knight

  • "Nay, Eudora," said Philothea, turning mournfully away: "Your feelings are strangely embittered; the calm light of reason is totally obscured by the wild torch-dance of your passions.

    Philothea A Grecian Romance

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