Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of torula.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We must not forget, however, that aerobian torulae and anaerobian ferments present an example of organisms apparently identical, in which, however, we have not yet been able to discover any ties of

    The Harvard Classics Volume 38 Scientific Papers (Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology)

  • Thus we have systematically employed the vaguest nomenclature, such as mucors, torulae, bacteria, and vibrios.

    V. The Physiological Theory of Fermentation. Another Example of Life Without Air-Fermentation of Lactate of Lime

  • We must not forget, however, that aërobian torulae and anaërobian ferments present an example of organisms apparently identical, in which, however, we have not yet been able to discover any ties of a common origin.

    V. The Physiological Theory of Fermentation. Another Example of Life Without Air-Fermentation of Lactate of Lime

  • And there is no doubt whatever that fermentation is excited only by the presence of some torula or other, and that that torula proceeds in our present experience, from pre-existing torulae.

    Lectures and Essays

  • From that single one, if the solution were kept at a fair temperature in a warm summer's day, there would be generated, in the course of a week, enough torulae to form

    Yeast

  • a week, enough torulae to form a scum at the top and to form lees at the bottom, and to change the perfectly tasteless and entirely harmless fluid, syrup, into a solution impregnated with the poisonous gas carbonic acid, impregnated with the poisonous substance alcohol; and that, in virtue of the changes worked upon the sugar by the vital activity of these infinitesimally small plants.

    Essays

  • From that single one, if the solution were kept at a fair temperature in a warm summer's day, there would be generated, in the course of a week, enough torulae to form a scum at the top and to form lees at the bottom, and to change the perfectly tasteless and entirely harmless fluid, syrup, into a solution impregnated with the poisonous gas carbonic acid, impregnated with the poisonous substance alcohol; and that, in virtue of the changes worked upon the sugar by the vital activity of these infinitesimally small plants.

    Lectures and Essays

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