Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of touch.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I usta gib hymn futrubbs ebbery nyte, and dat helped hymn tolerate beeing toucht sum.

    Yer face… - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • And I to know that no hand had toucht that wonderful garment, save the hands of maidens.

    The Night Land

  • I gave Mine Own an aid upward unto the cave, and afterward I passed up the gear, and the cloak when it did be dry; and so came upward also myself, and brought with me a boulder, that I balanced very light in the mouth of the cave, so that it should fall, if that anything toucht it; and this plan you do know of; for I used it before, as I have told.

    The Night Land

  • And I knew that the thing did be near, even as the Maid toucht me.

    The Night Land

  • And, lo! the Maid toucht me, and she drew me to look upon the near cliff of the Gorge.

    The Night Land

  • Although the rest (sitting at the Table with the Inquisitor) laughed heartily at this jest; yet he found himselfe toucht in another nature, having hypocritically received for one poore offence, above three hundred peeces of Gold, and not

    The Decameron

  • Can the Gods be toucht with the apprehension of our fraile passions?

    The Decameron

  • Well knew his conscience, that none of them were guilty of the crime, wherewith each so wilfully charged himselfe: being therefore truely toucht with remorse, he stept before Marcus Varro, saying.

    The Decameron

  • But because he shall find it a laborious taske, requiring inestimable strength and courage; your words have so toucht me to the quicke, that it becommeth me to let you effectually perceive (and within the compasse of few dayes) that as I have learned to conquer others, so I am not ignorant, in expressing the like power upon my selfe.

    The Decameron

  • Lodovico hearing the woman to be so highly commended, and never (as yet) feeling any thought of amorous inclination; became sodainely toucht with an earnest desire of seeing her, and his minde could entertaine no other matter, but onely of travailing thither to see her, yea, and to continue there, if occasion so served.

    The Decameron

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.