Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The uppermost part of a tree.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The crown or uppermost branches of a tree

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the upper branches and leaves of a tree or other plant

Etymologies

tree +‎ top (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The last thing she had expected to see as she reached the treetop was my face.

    Kate Morton Ebook Collection

  • For them, a treetop is a seat at the best restaurant in town.

    The Field Guide to Wildlife Habitats of the Eastern United States

  • It features excellent walking trails and a "treetop" canopy walkway on a suspended rope bridge.

    Kuala Lumpur

  • “Reality was giving its lesson,” wrote Ted Hughes in one of his Crow poems, “Its mishmash of scripture and physics,/With here, brains in hands, for example,/And there, legs in a treetop.”

    Don’t Fear the Reaper

  • Oh, and Health Care Reform and Cap/Trade would both pretty clearly be eligible for simple majority passage this way. treetop says:

    Matthew Yglesias » Judd Gregg on Reconciliation

  • It was dark green with a faded black top and I'd parked it right by a freshly blown down treetop.

    Camouflage Everything?

  • We loved it, even though everything was in French and it rained from the moment we got there until the moment we left.€44 adult, €26 child, including Cinéscénie; +33 2 5164 2594, puydufou.comElberryParc-en-CielIn this large wooded park in Lot-et-Garonne, the main attraction is the treetop adventure – it's similar to the UK's Go Ape.

    Readers' tips: family attractions in France

  • Howler monkeys, eco-lodges and treetop zipline tours have made Costa Rica a must-do destination for nature-loving families.

    Adventures, With Children

  • On the afternoon of August 20, 1910, a battering ram of wind moved through the drought-stricken national forests of Washington, Idaho, Montana, whipping the hundreds of small blazes burning across the forest floor into a roaring inferno that jumped from treetop to ridge as it raged, destroying towns and timber in an eyeblink.

    The Big Burn by Timothy Egan: Book summary

  • When the Parks Department invited me to visit the baby great horned owls in Alley Pond Park in Queens, I wasn't so naïve as to assume they'd have constructed the equivalent of one of those treetop hotels they have standing beside African salt licks, where you can watch rhinos, elephants and giraffes from the comfort of your bedroom.

    Guess Who Spotted an Owl

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