trimethylamine love

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A substituted ammonia in which the three hydrogen atoms are replaced by methyl, N(CH3)3.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Chem.) A colorless volatile alkaline liquid, N.(CH3)3, obtained from herring brine, beet roots, etc., with a characteristic herringlike odor. It is regarded as a substituted ammonia containing three methyl groups.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun organic chemistry The tertiary amine (CH3)3N; a colourless gas with a fishy smell that is a product of animal and vegetable decomposition.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It consists in submitting to the action of heat the hydrochlorate of trimethylamine, which is obtained as a by-product in the manufacture of potash of beets.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 358, November 11, 1882

  • The whole plant is sprinkled over with the white, pellucid meal, and contains much "trimethylamine," together with osmazome, and nitrate of potash; also it gives off free ammonia.

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • They make fish inedible in a fraction of the time they take to spoil beef or pork, by consuming the savory free amino acids and then proteins and turning them into obnoxious nitrogen-containing substances (ammonia, trimethylamine, indole, skatole, putrescine, cadaverine) and sulfur compounds (hydrogen sulfide, skunky methanethiol).

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • They make fish inedible in a fraction of the time they take to spoil beef or pork, by consuming the savory free amino acids and then proteins and turning them into obnoxious nitrogen-containing substances (ammonia, trimethylamine, indole, skatole, putrescine, cadaverine) and sulfur compounds (hydrogen sulfide, skunky methanethiol).

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Finfish contain some, but also rely on a largely tasteless amine called TMAO trimethylamine oxide.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The amino acids can in turn be broken into various amines, some of which are reminiscent of ocean fish (trimethylamine), others of spoiling meat (putrescine); into strong sulfur compounds (a specialty of smear bacteria), or into simple ammonia, a powerful aroma that in overripened cheeses is harsh, like household cleaner.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The amino acids can in turn be broken into various amines, some of which are reminiscent of ocean fish (trimethylamine), others of spoiling meat (putrescine); into strong sulfur compounds (a specialty of smear bacteria), or into simple ammonia, a powerful aroma that in overripened cheeses is harsh, like household cleaner.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Finfish contain some, but also rely on a largely tasteless amine called TMAO trimethylamine oxide.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The problem with TMAO and urea is that once the fish are killed, bacteria and fish enzymes convert the former into stinky TMA trimethylamine and the latter into kitchen-cleanser ammonia.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The problem with TMAO and urea is that once the fish are killed, bacteria and fish enzymes convert the former into stinky TMA trimethylamine and the latter into kitchen-cleanser ammonia.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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