Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of tuber.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The energy locked up in the sugars of nectar could have been used elsewhere in the economy of the plant, perhaps to make roots, or to fill the underground storage magazines that we call tubers, bulbs and corms, or even to make huge quantities of pollen for broadcasting to the four winds.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • I had bought the dahlia tubers from the regular grocery store, brought them home and buried them in the ground in late spring.

    D is for Dahlia « Salt and Pepper.

  • I had bought the dahlia tubers from the regular grocery store, brought them home and buried them in the ground in [...]

    2006 November « Salt and Pepper.

  • Chufa, a common sedge with nutlike tubers, is a particular favorite.

    What's on the Menu

  • The common potato and true yam are such swollen underground stem tips called tubers, while the sunchoke and ginger “root” are horizontal underground stems called rhizomes.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • The tubers are the staple carbohydrate foodstuff in many Pacific Islands, where they are eaten boiled, steamed or roasted, sometimes with the addition of coconut milk, or they may be sliced and fried and eaten with sugar.

    Chapter 29

  • The tubers are the swollen ends of stolons arising from the crown of the plant; each stolon bears only one tuber.

    Chapter 37

  • They are climbing perennial vines with shiny, heart-shaped leaves, arising from large underground stems that are technically called tubers rather than roots.

    Pinoy - Negosyo - Techs

  • TSC causes benign tumor-like lesions, which can affect every organ in the body and are called tubers when they occur in the brain.

    innovations-report

  • While the scope of this study did not include other downhill racers such as tubers and sledders, more and more experts are calling for helmet use for anyone who speeds down the slopes. —

    Mountain do: Protect your noggin on skis or a toboggan

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