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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of various free-living chiefly aquatic ciliate flatworms of the class Turbellaria, which includes the common planarians of the genus Dugesia.
  • adj. Of or belonging to the Turbellaria.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any flatworm of the class Turbellaria
  • adj. Characteristic of these creatures

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of the Turbellaria. Also used adjectively.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Causing little currents or vortexes of water by ciliary action, as the more minute members of the class Turbellaria; belonging to this class, as a worm.
  • n. A member of the class Turbellaria.

Etymologies

From New Latin Turbellāria, class name, from Latin turbella, bustle, diminutive of turba, turmoil (from the motion of their cilia in the water); see turbid.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From New Latin turbellaria (from Latin turbellae ("bustle"), from turba ("confusion")) +‎ -an (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • My favorites, however, are the free-living turbellarian worms, of which there are more than 4,000 species: that's about as numerous as all the mammal species put together.

    The Angry Evolutionist

  • Prey is immobilized by special structures called rhabdoids which enable the turbellarian to swallow the prey whole, in pieces or suck the body fluids out of it.

    Platyhelminthes

  • These are distributed over the body of the turbellarian, and collect waste and feed it into ducts which eventually lead to the exterior through pores.

    Platyhelminthes

  • A simple turbellarian (Rhabdocoelum). m mouth, sd gullet epithelium, sm gullet muscles, d gastric gut, nc renal canals, nm renal aperture, au eye, na olfactory pit.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 2

  • My favourites, however, are the free-living turbellarian worms, of which there are more than four thousand species: that’s about as numerous as all the mammal species put together.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

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