Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not bookish.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not addicted to books or reading.
  • Not cultivated by study; unlearned.

Etymologies

un- +‎ bookish (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • When a memoir turns out to be made up, we hear a lot about it in the media, even on the very unbookish Larry King Live.

    Elizabeth Benedict: Movies Instead of High School? Join The Film Club!

  • Another Rockefeller biographer, Jules Abels, noted, "It is ironic that conquest by book happened to John D. Rockefeller, who, though an admirer and patron of higher education, was himself a most unbookish person who must have been astounded when the pen proved mightier than the Almighty D.llar."

    'Taking on the Trust: The Epic Battle of Ida Tarbell and John D. Rockefeller'

  • Lycurgus their lawgiver was so addicted to elegant learning, as to have been the first that brought out of Ionia the scattered works of Homer, and sent the poet Thales from Crete to prepare and mollify the Spartan surliness with his smooth songs and odes, the better to plant among them law and civility, it is to be wondered how museless and unbookish they were, minding nought but the feats of war.

    Areopagitica

  • Life in the country was far better suited to this unbookish, unsociable man, whose happiest moments were spent by the Windrush, a trout river that ran past Asthall, or in the woods where he watched his young pheasants hatch.

    'The Mitfords: Letters Between Six Sisters'

  • When an unbookish individual is in the dumps, he is conscious of his own misery, but he does not attribute it to all the world.

    By the Christmas Fire

  • The plain, unbookish burgess holding both his sides at a public lecture has helped roar him into eminence.

    Twain, Mark: Selected Obituaries

  • We already know how to reach the heathen, the unbookish, the unthinking -- but how reach the educated -- the science-bitten?

    The Seeker

  • Spartan surliness with his smooth songs and odes, the better to plant among them law end civility, it is to be wondered how useless and unbookish they were, minding nought but the feats of war.

    The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume III (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland I

  • True it is that his allusions to nature are always incidental, -- never his main purpose or theme, as with many later poets; yet his accuracy and closeness to fact, and his wide and various knowledge of unbookish things, are seen in his light "touch and go" phrases and comparisons as clearly as in his more deliberate and central work.

    The Writings of John Burroughs — Volume 05: Pepacton

  • Is it only an unbookish jealousy, as Shakspeare calls it?

    The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 07 (of 12)

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