Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Not cheery; gloomy, pessimistic.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ cheery

Examples

  • London's Daily Mail has some decidedly uncheery news:

    The Inkblot

  • Bit depressing, therefore, on my Sunday evening visit to find the usual dreary British-city feel, gloomy louts in the main streets chucking beer cans and yelling obscenities, pounding beat from packed but uncheery booze-places somehow the jollier word "pub" doesn't apply, groups sitting on the pavement drunk, sense of loneliness everywhere.

    Preston...

  • Two stubbly men who like their dessert Knopf poobah Sonny Mehta and aforementioned GQ editor Art Cooper host a special screening in Tribeca of The Feast of Death, a documentary about decidedly uncheery author James Ellroy, and Mr. Ellroy will be there with his new book, The Cold Six Thousand.

    Eight Day Week

  • Two stubbly men who like their dessert Knopf poobah Sonny Mehta and aforementioned GQ editor Art Cooper host a special screening in Tribeca of The Feast of Death, a documentary about decidedly uncheery author James Ellroy, and Mr. Ellroy will be there with his new book, The Cold Six Thousand.

    Eight Day Week

  • From whatever reason, the fact remains that his letters are by no means uncheery reading; his books and study, most of all his friendships (with one fellow-captive especially), seem to have kept him contented and even happy.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 152, March 7, 1917

  • I doubt MacCailein Mor heard little of this uncheery criticism, for he was looking in a seeming blank abstraction out of the end window at the town lights increasing in number as the minutes passed.

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • We owe them nothing but good will; for we rather regard things poetically than politically, and we are anxious to inform and amuse the reader -- not to perplex, by constantly reminding him of his uncheery lot in life.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 20, No. 584. (Supplement to Vol. 20)

  • The intuitive answer will make the moral observer regret that man should so often place the interdict on his own happiness, and then peevishly repine at his uncheery lot.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 12, No. 330, September 6, 1828

  • In the one all nature is free, whilst the debauchee frowns on her laughing landscapes; in the other, conscience and her busy devils are at work -- yet thousands thus embitter life's cup, and then repine at their uncheery lot.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 367, April 25, 1829

  • On the whole, I have sat under the wing of Saint Swithin; uncheery, sluggish, murky, as the wettest of his Days; -- hoping always, nevertheless, that blue sky, figurative and real, does exist, and will demonstrate itself by and by.

    The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, Vol. I

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