Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not coercive.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ coercive

Examples

  • For it remains uncertain, in doctrine, whether the replacement of the government of men by the admin - istration of things is making for a rational society with an uncoercive guiding authority or for a free society with a functionally differentiated collaboration among equals.

    AUTHORITY

  • However ambiguous his position on the ends of politics was, moreover, his distinction between the insecurity of de facto princely power, on the one hand, and the pre-coercive authority of the people who empower their elected officials or the uncoercive authority of the “legislator” who estab - lishes the principles of government and then divests himself of its power, on the other, adumbrated the differential origins of political power and authority as such.

    AUTHORITY

  • But even if it is not literally identified with the original idea of authority, the current commitment to a normative psychic hierarchy which should serve to direct the reorganization of society is an indication that the recurrent pattern of a pure, uncoercive au - thority remains viable.

    AUTHORITY

  • Actually, however, he went beyond this nominal solution, which scarcely differed in principle from the liberal Mill's, to the characteristic conservative device of connecting the uncoercive authority of the innovator or the founder with the coercive authority of the organs which would enforce the innovation.

    AUTHORITY

  • The only pure — i.e., spontaneous and uncoercive — social authorities in the new sociology tended to be dead authorities.

    AUTHORITY

  • Among the sources of doctrinal au - thority, tradition clearly represented what was most distinctive in the original idea of uncoercive authority.

    AUTHORITY

  • But the generally hostile attitude of the empiricists toward authority, based upon their view of it as an aspect of power, was qualified by their acknowl - edgment of an uncoercive dimension of it, transitional and subordinate in scope but adequate to explain the

    AUTHORITY

  • The establishment of this uncoercive sphere within an expanded realm of politics meant more than the formal dislocation of authority from the acknowledged supe - riority of higher over lower realms in the human hier - archy to the acknowledged superiority of the final over the instrumental orbits of the same realm.

    AUTHORITY

  • Quotations from John Caird — They are good as restatements of religious experience, but uncoercive as reasoned proof —

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

  • Its principles -- Quotations from John Caird -- They are good as restatements of religious experience, but uncoercive as reasoned proof -- What philosophy can do for religion by transforming herself into "science of religions."

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

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