Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Not fancy; simple

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ fancy

Examples

  • Even in unfancy restaurants, the mark-ups are vertiginous.

    Wine: You can count on barbera

  • JavaScript option offers 'unfancy' web development

    Techworld.com News

  • The size of the so-called Passage Feydeau (which opened in 1791 and was demolished in 1824) can be judged by the number of its tenants: several milliners and haberdashers, two book stalls, a florist, a tobacconist, a stamp dealer, a chestnut seller, and, along the entire length of the upper floor, an estaminet (a distinctly unfancy type of café that permitted smoking).1

    Makeshift Metropolis

  • "It seems fancy," said art dealer Alberto "Tico" Mugrabi on the way in, "but it could go unfancy at any second."

    Pop Art: Jackson as Archangel

  • Books by TV journalists range from the charming to the useless, but they almost always have one thing in common -- they're about the journalist in question, the fancy people he or she has met, or the unfancy family that he or she came from.

    Weekend Book Club - Swampland - TIME.com

  • The size of the so-called Passage Feydeau (which opened in 1791 and was demolished in 1824) can be judged by the number of its tenants: several milliners and haberdashers, two book stalls, a florist, a tobacconist, a stamp dealer, a chestnut seller, and, along the entire length of the upper floor, an estaminet (a distinctly unfancy type of café that permitted smoking).1

    Makeshift Metropolis

  • Indeed, like the click of a digital camera, almost as soon as dessert was served, things went unfancy.

    Pop Art: Jackson as Archangel

  • Christopher Acebo's unfancy unit set is a shallow, diagonally canted playing space in which the complex lighting of Christopher Akerlind creates the illusion of unexpected depth.

    Hamlet the Hipster

  • Today it is a decidedly unfancy pub, which serves platters of local seafood, with as little done to them as possible.

    The 20 best places to eat in Britain this summer

  • The size of the so-called Passage Feydeau (which opened in 1791 and was demolished in 1824) can be judged by the number of its tenants: several milliners and haberdashers, two book stalls, a florist, a tobacconist, a stamp dealer, a chestnut seller, and, along the entire length of the upper floor, an estaminet (a distinctly unfancy type of café that permitted smoking).1

    Makeshift Metropolis

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