Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of unhoop.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • On the edge of the river I could faintly make out the only two black things in all the prospect that seemed to be standing upright; one of these was the beacon by which the sailors steered, — like an unhooped cask upon a pole, — an ugly thing when you were near it; the other, a gibbet, with some chains hanging to it which had once held a pirate.

    Great Expectations

  • So saying, he began to strip the arm of the captain, who perceiving his aim, “Avast, brother,” cried he, “you go the wrong way to work; you may as well rummage the afterhold when the damage is in the forecastle; I shall right again when my jaws are unhooped.”

    The Life and Adventures of Sir Launcelot Greaves

  • Now, to any one not fully acquainted with the ways of the leviathans, it might seem an absurdly hopeless task thus to seek out one solitary creature in the unhooped oceans of this planet.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • In front of the jacket a single row of hoops is shrunk on the tube and extends toward the muzzle, leaving 91 inches of the muzzle end of the tube unhooped.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 561, October 2, 1886

  • The bachelor who cares to see unhooped womanhood once more before he dies should go to the Yo-Semite.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 80, June, 1864

  • The layers in tubs will vary greatly, the butter being made at different times; so, to try if the whole tub be good, the cask should be unhooped, and the butter tried between the staves.

    The Book of Household Management

  • On the edge of the river I could faintly make out the only two black things in all the prospect that seemed to be standing upright; one of these was the beacon by which the sailors steered - like an unhooped cask upon a pole - an ugly thing when you were near it; the other a gibbet, with some chains hanging to it which had once held a pirate.

    Great Expectations

  • On the edge of the river I could faintly make out the only two black things in all the prospect that seemed to be standing upright; one of these was the beacon by which the sailors steered -- like an unhooped cask upon a pole -- an ugly thing when you were near it; the other a gibbet, with some chains hanging to it which had once held a pirate.

    Great Expectations

  • On the edge of the river I could faintly make out the only two black things in all the prospect that seemed to be standing upright; one of these was the beacon by which the sailors steered, -- like an unhooped cask upon a pole, -- an ugly thing when you were near it; the other, a gibbet, with some chains hanging to it which had once held a pirate.

    Great Expectations

  • So saying, he began to strip the arm of the captain, who perceiving his aim, "Avast, brother," cried he, "you go the wrong way to work; you may as well rummage the afterhold when the damage is in the forecastle; I shall right again when my jaws are unhooped."

    The Adventures of Sir Launcelot Greaves

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