Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In an unimaginable manner; inconceivably.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adverb To an extent or in a way that cannot be, or could not have been, imagined

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adverb to an unimaginable extent

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From unimaginable +‎ -ly.

Examples

  • Blessings on this woman because she epitomizes courage under fire in unimaginably difficult circumstances.

    Elizabeth Edwards: I expect a paternity test on Hunter's child

  • The semantic web would greatly stimulate the analysis of large scientific datasets, for example -- searching for patterns in unimaginably huge swathes of information, such as a microarray or a genome, in the attempt to wrest from all that clever biology something meaningful to our meagre human brains.

    Web/Tech

  • If we "assume the Big Bang" as if it were something that happened outside the bounds of reality, then we have a universe that, magically, begins fully wound-up, comprised of potential energy in unimaginably super-concentrated form.

    Bill Shireman: What I Learned from My Dead Grandfather

  • If we "assume the Big Bang" as if it were something that happened outside the bounds of reality, then we have a universe that, magically, begins fully wound-up, comprised of potential energy in unimaginably super-concentrated form.

    Bill Shireman: What I Learned from My Dead Grandfather

  • If we "assume the Big Bang" as if it were something that happened outside the bounds of reality, then we have a universe that, magically, begins fully wound-up, comprised of potential energy in unimaginably super-concentrated form.

    Bill Shireman: Science, Religion, and Sustainability: Lessons from My Grandfather

  • The semantic web would greatly stimulate the analysis of large scientific datasets, for example -- searching for patterns in unimaginably huge swathes of information, such as a microarray or a genome, in the attempt to wrest from all that clever biology something meaningful to our meagre human brains.

    The Economist on the semantic web

  • The semantic web would greatly stimulate the analysis of large scientific datasets, for example -- searching for patterns in unimaginably huge swathes of information, such as a microarray or a genome, in the attempt to wrest from all that clever biology something meaningful to our meagre human brains.

    September 2007

  • The semantic web would greatly stimulate the analysis of large scientific datasets, for example -- searching for patterns in unimaginably huge swathes of information, such as a microarray or a genome, in the attempt to wrest from all that clever biology something meaningful to our meagre human brains.

    The Economist on the semantic web

  • This story reminds me what a loss Dr. Tiller’s life is for the United States, because of the extraordinary service that he provided for women and families in unimaginably difficult situations.

    What Happened When an Anti-Choice Catholic Woman Needed An Abortion « Planning the Day

  • As soft as a sponge cake being carried to a Save-the-Arts rally at a sustainable farmer's market in northern Vermont by a liberal pacifist vegan who forgot to take his Viagra -- in other words, unimaginably, ridiculously soft.

    Martin Marks: In Soft Water

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.