unincarcerated love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not incarcerated.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And all these corporations experienced a powerful boost in shareholder profits as a result of using convicts, rather than "unincarcerated," labor.

    GlobalResearch.ca

  • Tickled, scarified, the unincarcerated viewer thanks his lucky stars and solemnly wonders after what fashion he might, if it came to it, do his own time.

    Prison Porn

  • This could be a serious issue if inmates ARE finally restored to the rolls because it would obviously impact the distribution of votes if the prison location determined the precinct and that could create an inherent problem if the number of inmates were near, or as in some areas, exceeded the number of unincarcerated voters.

    One Person/ One Vote…no exceptions

  • Refusing the demands to shave her skull, she broke away from the unincarcerated B-list Family members to the relative safety of a "jailhouse" love affair with "Tex", a convicted killer who was still clearly out of his mind and had almost no chance of ever being paroled.

    John Waters: Leslie Van Houten: A Friendship, Part 1 of 5

  • The way you must live your life if you are to remain unincarcerated and uninstitutionalized means that you must reject lots of what the Bible has to say.

    Debunking Debunking Christianity Christianity

  • The Eighth Amendment is stating that the defendant must be allowed to post reasonable bail in order to be unincarcerated before the trial.

    Bill Of Rights in my opinion

  • We might be tempted to say that the unincarcerated person has more and better choices of actions.

    Coercion

  • So it is probably more helpful to focus on the greater quality and desirability of the actions open to the unincarcerated person.

    Coercion

  • If such a regime is in fact valuable, then the threat to incarcerate thieves may both reduce people's freedom with respect to one sort of action (by making stealing incompossible with remaining unincarcerated), while enhancing it with respect to others (by making it possible to accumulate, use, and trade private property).

    Coercion

  • The incarcerated and unincarcerated both have indeterminately many different things they can do, each can do only perform some small range of those actions at any one time.

    Coercion

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