Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To unload (cargo) from a ship.
  • transitive v. To unload (a ship).
  • intransitive v. To discharge a cargo.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To unload.
  • v. To disburden; take the burden from; relieve.
  • v. To discharge the cargo from.
  • v. To discharge a cargo; discharge a burden.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To take the load from; to take out the cargo of.
  • transitive v. To unload; to remove, or to have removed, as a load or a burden; to discharge.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To unload; take out the cargo of.
  • To unburden; remove, as a load or burden; discharge.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. take the load off (a container or vehicle)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From un- + lade

Examples

  • And when they unlade any Ship of great fraught, there are prepared

    The Decameron

  • Now when we had discovered Cyprus, we left it on the left hand, and sailed into Syria, and landed at Tyre: for there the ship was to unlade her burden.

    Acts 21.

  • It is of sincere faith, to unlade our unbelief in the bosom of our God.

    The Sermons of John Owen

  • She ran, however, upon the bar, and the people were forced to unlade her to get off.

    Woman on the American Frontier

  • And when we had discovered Cyprus, leaving it on the left hand, we sailed into Syria, and came to Tyre: for there the ship was to unlade her burden.

    The Bible, Douay-Rheims, Book 51: Acts The Challoner Revision

  • It being of great consequence to the plantation, that Port-Towns should be built and preserved; therefore, whosoever shall lade or unlade any commodity at any other place but a Port-Town, shall forfeit to the

    An Historical Account of the Rise and Progress of the Colonies of South Carolina and Georgia, Volume 1

  • At our coming to the Governor's House we found the great door where the mules do usually unlade, even then opened, a candle lighted upon the top of the stairs; and a fair gennet ready saddled, either for the Governor himself, or some other of his household to carry it after him.

    Sir Francis Drake Revived

  • The inconveniences in Spain and Portugal were still greater, for they would by no means suffer our ships, especially those from London, to come into any of their ports, much less to unlade.

    A Journal Of The Plague Year

  • But from London they would not suffer them to come into port, much less to unlade their goods, upon any terms whatever, and this strictness was especially used with them in Spain and Italy.

    A Journal Of The Plague Year

  • At our coming to the Governor’s House, we found the great door where the mules do usually unlade, even then opened, a candle lighted upon the top of the stairs; and a fair gennet ready saddled, either for the Governor himself, or some other of his household to carry it after him.

    Sir Francis Drake Revived. Paras. 1-99

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