Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adv. In an unmanful manner.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adv. without qualities thought to befit a man

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

unmanful +‎ -ly

Examples

  • Well now, Flash old son, says you, that's compensation surely, for all the horrors unmanfully endured - and don't forget that along the road you've had enough assorted trollop to fill Chelsea Barracks, with an annexe at Alder-shot.

    Watershed

  • So Sara Lee's room had a different occupant for a time, a thin and fine-worn young Belgian, who yielded to Sara Lee when Jean gave up in despair, and who proceeded, most unmanfully, to faint as soon as he was between the blankets.

    The Amazing Interlude

  • The fear of physical suffering was not uppermost in his mind, nor even the fear that he would walk unmanfully to the high gallows, but a greater dread that if he died now, here, at Dongola, Ethne would never take back that fourth feather, and his strong hope of the "afterwards" would never come to its fulfilment.

    The Four Feathers

  • He took love unmanfully; the passion struck at his weakness; in wrath at the humiliation, if only to revenge himself for that, he could be fiendish; he knew it, and loathed the desired fair creature who caused and exposed to him these cracks in his nature, whence there came a brimstone stench of the infernal pits.

    The Amazing Marriage — Volume 2

  • When a Poor-spirited Creature that died at the same time for his Crimes bemoaned himself unmanfully, he rebuked him with this Question, Is it no Consolation to such a Man as thou art to die with Phocion?

    Spectator, August 2, 1711

  • When a Poor-spirited Creature that died at the same time for his Crimes bemoaned himself unmanfully, he rebuked him with this Question, Is it no Consolation to such a Man as thou art to die with _Phocion?

    The Spectator, Volume 1 Eighteenth-Century Periodical Essays

  • “It was — it was only something, sir” — the lieutenant blushed, and hesitated, and looked away unmanfully — “which I asked Captain Honyman to leave out, because — because it had nothing to do with it.

    Springhaven

  • "It was -- it was only something, sir" -- the lieutenant blushed, and hesitated, and looked away unmanfully -- "which I asked Captain Honyman to leave out, because -- because it had nothing to do with it.

    Springhaven : a Tale of the Great War

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