Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Same as uneath.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adverb Obsolete spelling of uneath. Hard, difficult, not easy

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And he maketh a ruthful noise and ghastful, when one proffereth to fight with another: and unneth is hurt when he is thrown down off an high place.

    Normal Medieval Animal Monday

  • And he maketh a ruthful noise and ghastful, when one proffereth to fight with another: and unneth is hurt when he is thrown down off an high place.

    Archive 2008-05-01

  • Enchirius is a little fish unneth half a foot long: for though he be full little of body, nathless he is most of virtue.

    A WMAM too tired for catchy titles

  • Enchirius is a little fish unneth half a foot long: for though he be full little of body, nathless he is most of virtue.

    Archive 2008-05-01

  • The nursingwoman answered him and said that that woman was in throes now full three days and that it would be a hard birth unneth to bear but that now in a little it would be.

    Ulysses

  • The nursingwoman answered him and said that that woman was in throes now full three days and that it would be a hard birth unneth to bear but that now in a little it would be.

    Ulysses

  • In the meanwhile, as they thus stood talking together, there came twelve nuns which brought with them Galahad, the which was passing fair and well made, that unneth in the world men might not find his match; and all those ladies wept.

    Song and Legend from the Middle Ages

  • And if shipmen come unwarily thereby, unneth they scape without peril.

    Mediaeval Lore from Bartholomew Anglicus

  • Always they cry, jangle, and jape; that unneth they be still while they sleep.

    Mediaeval Lore from Bartholomew Anglicus

  • Jerome saith, that the dragon is a full thirsty beast, insomuch that unneth he may have water enough to quench his great thirst; and openeth his mouth therefore against the wind, to quench the burning of his thirst in that wise.

    Mediaeval Lore from Bartholomew Anglicus

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