Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having no peer; unparalleled.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having no peer; unequaled; unparalleled.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having no peer or equal; unequaled.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- + peer + -ed

Examples

  • Have now and hold this house unpeered; remember thy glory; thy might declare; watch for the foe!

    Beowulf

  • -- 'Twas a lord unpeered, every way blameless, till age had broken

    Beowulf

  • "O noble princess and unpeered pearl," replied the knight their chief, "dost thou know who is this man with thee?"

    The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Volume II

  • O all unpeered in pride of place, to whom munificence Is as a birthright, Lord and King, whom all in all confess,

    The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Volume III

  • Then passed with me the night, embracing, cheek to cheek, A loveling midst mankind unpeered and past compare.

    The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Volume IV

  • In a statement today, the company said that Sprint unpeered from Cogent's network at 4.30 p.m. on October 31, 2008 ...

    Megite Technology News: What's Happening Right Now

  • To Hrothgar I in greatness of soul would succor bring, so the Wise-and-Brave 19 may worst his foes, if ever the end of ills is fated, of cruel contest, if cure shall follow, and the boiling care-waves cooler grow; else ever afterward anguish-days he shall suffer in sorrow while stands in place high on its hill that house unpeered!”

    Beowulf

  • As they hastened onward, Hrothgar’s gift they lauded at length. — ’Twas a lord unpeered, every way blameless, till age had broken — it spareth no mortal — his splendid might.

    Beowulf

  • To Hrothgar I in greatness of soul would succor bring, so the Wise-and-Brave 19 may worst his foes, — if ever the end of ills is fated, of cruel contest, if cure shall follow, and the boiling care-waves cooler grow; else ever afterward anguish-days he shall suffer in sorrow while stands in place high on its hill that house unpeered!”

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

  • To Hrothgar I in greatness of soul would succor bring, so the Wise-and-Brave {4a} may worst his foes, -- if ever the end of ills is fated, of cruel contest, if cure shall follow, and the boiling care-waves cooler grow; else ever afterward anguish-days he shall suffer in sorrow while stands in place high on its hill that house unpeered! "

    Beowulf

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