Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not retentive

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not retentive.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. (of memory) deficient in retentiveness or range

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “It was nae sic thing,” said Madge, whose unretentive memory let out, in the eagerness of contradiction, all that she would have most wished to keep concealed, had her judgment been equal to her inclination.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • Hogarth personated the spectre, but so unretentive -- (we are told) -- was his memory that though the speech consisted only of two lines he was unable to get them by heart, and his facetious associates wrote them on an illuminated lantern that he might read them when he came upon the stage.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 14, No. 382, July 25, 1829

  • The old Danaïde only saw an opportunity for pouring another people into her ill-made and unretentive cask.

    The Roman Question

  • With great deference to former critics, I think this emendation is the most probable, as it accords with the sentiment of Helena, who means to depict her _vast_ but unretentive sieve, into which she poured the waters of her love.

    Notes and Queries, Number 73, March 22, 1851 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • ` ` It was nae sic thing, '' said Madge, whose unretentive memory let out, in the eagerness of contradiction, all that she would have most wished to keep concealed, had her judgment been equal to her inclination.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • "It was nae sic thing," said Madge, whose unretentive memory let out, in the eagerness of contradiction, all that she would have most wished to keep concealed, had her judgment been equal to her inclination.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete

  • To go and tell any friend, wife, or mistress, any secret with which they have nothing to do, is discovering to them such an unretentive weakness, as must convince them that you will tell it to twenty others, and consequently that they may reveal it without the risk of being discovered.

    Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1748

  • We can understand the mood of which it is the utterance; the feeling of despair that sometimes comes over the most patient instructor when he finds that all his efforts to hammer some truth into, or to print some impression on, the brain or heart of man or boy, have been foiled, and that years, it may be, of patient work have scarcely left more traces on unretentive minds than remain on the ocean of the passage through it of a keel.

    Expositions of Holy Scripture St. Mark

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