Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective That cannot be revised.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ revisable

Examples

  • Within foundationalist approaches some subset of beliefs is considered to be unrevisable, thereby serving as a foundation on which all other beliefs are to be based.

    John Rawls

  • "To him fatherhood was one long unrevisable bourgeois script full of unexpected plot turns and predictable blow-ups in the third act, but that was the script he had been handed and now he was in the play."

    48 entries from November 2006

  • "To him fatherhood was one long unrevisable bourgeois script full of unexpected plot turns and predictable blow-ups in the third act, but that was the script he had been handed and now he was in the play."

    Saul and Patsy by Charles Baxter

  • "To him fatherhood was one long unrevisable bourgeois script full of unexpected plot turns and predictable blow-ups in the third act, but that was the script he had been handed and now he was in the play."

    Saul and Patsy by Charles Baxter

  • They are unrevisable only in a weak sense, in that their proper framework itself may become inapplicable and so get discarded.

    Vienna Circle

  • Therein lay the weakness Quine's argument could exploit: analytic truths remained unrevisable in a strong sense.

    Vienna Circle

  • In ethics, some foundationalist approaches take some subset of our moral beliefs as fixed or unrevisable.

    Reflective Equilibrium

  • For example, some foundationalists view particular moral judgments as fixed; others might think it is our moral principles or some deeper theoretical beliefs from which such principles might be derived that are fixed and unrevisable.

    Reflective Equilibrium

  • Since (*) is supposed to be analytic, it's supposed to be unrevisable.

    Scientific Realism

  • Victories like these, seemingly so casual, really as final and as unrevisable as Fate, might well cause Englishmen to suspect that Destiny itself worked with them, and that an Englishman could be trusted to endure through any difficulties to a triumphant conclusion.

    George Washington

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