Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. not rimed

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. not having rhyme

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ rimed

Examples

  • Brian Turner's "Here, Bullet" consists of sixteen unrimed lines.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • 'Horatian' ode forms, that is in regular short stanzas, the 'Ode Written in the Year 1746' and the 'Ode to Evening' (unrimed), are particularly fine.

    A History of English Literature

  • Hills, and like him, they wrote in the Anglo-Saxon verse form, alliterative, unrimed, and in this case without stanza divisions.

    A History of English Literature

  • The verse is unrimed, not arranged in stanzas, and with lines more commonly end-stopped (with distinct pauses at the ends) than is true in good modern poetry.

    A History of English Literature

  • The meter, also, is interesting -- the Anglo-Saxon unrimed alliterative verse, but divided into long stanzas of irregular length, each ending in a 'bob' of five short riming lines.

    A History of English Literature

  • In rimed verse the end of the line is so emphasized that the line itself stands out as a very perceptible rhythmic unit; in unrimed verse, however, the line is frequently not felt as a unit at all, but is so interwoven with the natural prose rhythm of the words as to be almost indistinguishable to the ear, though of course visible to the eye on the printed page.

    The Principles of English Versification

  • For convenience they may be distinguished, according as verse or prose predominates, as (1) irregular unrimed metre, (2) very free blank verse, (3) unusual mingling of metre and prose, a kind of recitative, and (4) mere prose printed as verse, or what may be called free-verse _par excellence_.

    The Principles of English Versification

  • Tennyson's unrimed lyrics and Collins 'Ode to Evening are unusual, though successful, experiments.

    The Principles of English Versification

  • It is not always easier to write in unrimed measures, for, as Milton proudly implied, good blank verse is the most difficult of all metres.

    The Principles of English Versification

  • Of the first sort are the unrimed choruses in Milton's Samson Agonistes, the metre of Southey's once-admired Thalaba and the Curse of Kehama, and parts of Shelley's Queen Mab.

    The Principles of English Versification

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