Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of unsadden.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The unsaddened heart, no longer prudish, will not now, I hope, give the sable turn to every address of the man she dislikes not.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • For now the shadow of a real trouble had come, the little books were full of help and comfort, and as they dressed, they agreed to say good - bye cheerfully and hopefully, and send their mother on her anxious journey unsaddened by tears or complaints from them.

    Little Women

  • Here Mary was able to live unsaddened for a time; the Swiss nurse for the children, a cook and man-servant, sufficed for in-door and out-door work, and Mary, true to her name, was able to occupy herself with spiritual and intellectual employment, not to the neglect of domestic, as the succession of visitors entertained must prove; study, drawing, and her beloved work of Frankenstein were making rapid progress.

    Mrs Shelley

  • Here Mary was able to live unsaddened for a time; the Swiss nurse for the children, a cook and man-servant, sufficed for in-door and out-door work, and Mary, true to her name, was able to occupy herself with spiritual and intellectual employment, not to the neglect of domestic, as the succession of visitors entertained must prove; study, drawing, and her beloved work of _Frankenstein_ were making rapid progress.

    Mrs. Shelley

  • For now the shadow of a real trouble had come, the little books were full of help and comfort, and as they dressed, they agreed to say goodbye cheerfully and hopefully, and send their mother on her anxious journey unsaddened by tears or complaints from them.

    Little Women

  • But, repressing all argument, and appearing to acquiesce in the possibility of such an arrangement, he left her benevolent delight unsaddened -- and before the morning he was gone.

    What Will He Do with It? — Volume 08

  • The Canadians began to play and sing those gay, gay airs of old France which they have kept unsaddened through all the dark events that have changed the popular mood of the mother country; they have matched words to them in celebration of their life on the great rivers and in the vast forests of the North, and in these blithe barcaroles and hunting-songs breathes the joyous spirit of a France that knows neither doubt nor care, -- France untouched by Revolution or Napoleonic wars; some of the airs still keep the very words that came over seas with them two hundred years ago.

    A Modern Instance

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.