Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not stiffened.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ stiffened

Examples

  • Quoth the Shaykh (and his mien unstiffened for that his soul inclined towards her), “By Allah, this is not well!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Here a sham soldier, whistling cheerfully while he unwound the bandages of his false wound, and unstiffened his sound and vigorous knee, strapped up since the morning in yards of ligature.

    VI. The Broken Pitcher. Book II

  • And could he have seen his whole figure in a looking-glass, with the brim of his hat unstiffened and hanging down, and his hair straight and sticking to his face, he would have considered himself a still greater beauty.

    Chapter XXXVII

  • Waters, halting upon the cobbles, sniffed with recognition and unstiffened his mind as he gazed along the dreary street.

    Those Who Smiled And Eleven Other Stories

  • He wore a man's sombrero, old and dirty, which came down to his ears and flopped a wide, unstiffened brim around his face.

    Emerson's Wife and Other Western Stories

  • After remarking this I happened to look up into Mr. Tennyson's face, which then wore its habitual expression of serious and grand simplicity; and I thought that the rough and dull linen, with the natural, unstiffened fall about the neck, formed a most artistic sculpturesque setting for the handsome head well poised above it.

    Philip Gilbert Hamerton

  • Any one who is over-starched might well come here to be unstiffened.

    The Stark Munro Letters

  • He wore a large horse-shoe pin in his unstiffened stock.

    The Dew of Their Youth

  • Pure silk, that is silk unstiffened with gums, no matter how thickly and heavily it is woven, is soft and yielding and will fall into folds without sharp angles.

    Principles of Home Decoration With Practical Examples

  • Mr. Tennyson's face, which then wore its habitual expression of serious and grand simplicity; and I thought that the rough and dull linen, with the natural, unstiffened fall about the neck, formed a most artistic sculpturesque setting for the handsome head well poised above it.

    Philip Gilbert Hamerton An Autobiography, 1834-1858, and a Memoir by His Wife, 1858-1894

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