Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of untune.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We can hear Shakespeare's Ulysses in the background on untuning the string of order, and the deep metaphysical fear that sedition aroused in Hooker's day.

    The Richard Hooker Lecture: Richard Hooker (c1554-1600): The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity Revisited The Temple Church, London

  • I do not know quite what is meant by untuning the sky and, if I did,

    The Note-Books of Samuel Butler

  • From such workmanship, every thing specially stimulant of any one part of the mind, every thing that ministers to the process of self-excitation, every thing that fosters an unhealthy consciousness by untuning the inward harmonies of our being, every thing that appeals to the springs of vanity and self-applause, or invites us to any sort of glass-gazing pleasure, -- every such thing is, by an innate law of the work, excluded.

    Shakespeare: His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I. With An Historical Sketch Of The Origin And Growth Of The Drama In England

  • The conclusion is likewise striking; but it includes an image so awful in itself, that it can owe little to poetry; and I could wish the antithesis of _musick untuning_ had found some other place:

    Lives of the Poets, Volume 1

  • Life and growth are an attuning, death and decay are an untuning; both involve a succession of greater or smaller attunings and untunings; organic life is "the diapason closing full in man"; it is the fulness of a tone that varies in pitch, quality, and in the harmonics to which it gives rise; it ranges through every degree of complexity from the endless combinations of life-and-death within life-and-death which we find in the mammalia, to the comparative simplicity of the amoeba.

    Luck or Cunning?

  • From such workmanship, every thing specially stimulant of any one part of the mind, every thing that ministers to the process of self-excitation, every thing that fosters an unhealthy consciousness by untuning the inward harmonies of our being, every thing that appeals to the springs of vanity and self-applause, or invites us to any sort of glass-gazing pleasure, ” every such thing is, by an innate law of the work, excluded.

    Shakespeare His Life Art And Characters

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